Do I Need Planning Permission For A Satellite Dish

Guidance specific to Scotland only.

Do I need planning permission to install a satellite dish?

What is planning permision?

Planning permission is generally NOT required (permitted development) for the installation of a satellite dish with the following exceptions.

If you are unsure you should check with your local planning department. Find an Architect, Architectural Technician, or Planner to help with your project on Do I Need Permissions Who Can Help Pages.

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If your proposed satellite dish does not meet the above criteria you will need to apply for planning permission. More information on applying for planning permission below.

What do I need for a satellite dish planning application?

You will need to make a planning application. If you are unsure you should consult with your local architectural service provider. Find someone to help in our who can help section.

You will be required to provide the following information for a planning application.

  • Application forms (you can download these from your local council website).
  • An OS based location plan showing the property you wish to install the satellite dish on.
  • Detail on the location of the dish (the easiest way to do this may be to take photos of your building and over mark the location of the proposed satellite dish)
  • Details on the size and colour of the dish.
  • Suplamentary information may be required depending on your project.

If you are considering lodging your own planning application you can submit your planning application online at the Scottish government’s e-planning website. Submitting your planning application online can save time and money. The e-planning website will also provide you with a checklist of information required for your application. Visit the Scottish government’s e-planning website to get started.

Take a look at Do I Need Permissions planning permission Scotland guide for information on preparing and lodging a planning application.

Things to consider.

  • Where will you locate the dish. Try to locate the dish in a position that cannot be seen from the ground or locate the dish at ground level so it cannot be seen from a distance.
  • You can paint the satellite dish to blend in with the surrounding environment.
  • Remember the dish doesn’t have to be located on a building, it could be in the garden.
  • Ensure you locate your dish in a suitable location to provide a good signal.
  • If you live in a flatted building consider teaming up with your neighbours to have one communal dish installed.

Planning permission (where required) for a satellite dish costs £202 (from 1st November 2014). This fee is payable to your local council. You may be asked to pay additional fees for advertising your application. This happens when the planning department cannot find contact details for any neighbours that are required to be notified. This fee varies.

View planning permission fees for other projects on Do I Need Permissions planning fees Scotland page.

The fee for architectural drawings varies depending on your individual requirements. Find an Architect, Architectural Technician, or Planner to help with your project on Do I Need Permissions Who Can Help Pages.

How long does planning permission take?

Planning permission can take between 6-8 weeks for a decision. Your planning application can be refused if found to be unsuitable. A decision may take longer if your proposals are complex or further information is required.

Most councils allow you to track the progress of your application on-line. You can also see if anyone has commented on your proposals. Visit Do I Need Permissions view planning applications in my area page to find your local planning department website.

If you are considering lodging your own planning application you can submit your planning application online at the Scottish government’s e-planning website. Submitting your planning application online can save time and money. Visit the Scottish government’s e-planning website to get started.

How is my planning application decided?

Your application will be allocated to a planning officer. They may visit your property and consider comments from the public or other relevant bodies and take account of the Development Plan and other national policy and advice. Some applications will be decided by members of a planning committee. Your local council will delegate some decision making to your allocated planning officer. The planning department will notify you of how it intends to decide your application and of the decision.

Your planning application can be refused. If your application is refused you have a right to request either.

  • An appeal to Scottish Ministers.
  • Or a review by the planning departments local review board.

Only one of these options will be available depending on your specific application. The option available to you will be explained in early correspondence from the planning department and once your application has progressed and a decision has been made. If you are unsure you should contact your local planning department or architectural service provider for advice.

With any appeal or review you will be required to provide valid reasons or supporting information as to why your application should be approved.

How long does planning permission last?

Planning permission is valid for 3 years from the date of approval. Works should be started within this time period.

Your planning approval will become invalid if you do not start your project within this time period. In some cases an extension may be granted. You should contact your local planning department should you wish to discuss extending your planning permission.

Guidance specific to England only.

Do I need planning permission to install a satellite dish?

The following guidance applies to properties up to 15 metres in height.

Houses and buildings not in designated areas

Unless your house (or the building in which you live) is in a designated area, you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as:

  • There will be no more than two antennas on the property overall. (These may be on the front or back of the building, on the roof, attached to the chimney, or in the garden);
  • If you are installing a single antenna, it is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • If you are installing two antennas, one is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension, and the other is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • The cubic capacity of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
  • An antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension; and
  • An antenna mounted on the roof only sticks out above the roof when there is a chimney-stack. In this case, the antenna should not stick out more than 60 centimetres above the highest part of the roof, or above the highest part of the chimney stack, whichever is lower.

Houses and buildings in designated areas

If your house (or the building in which you live) is in a designated area, you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as:

  • there will be no more than two antennas on the property overall;
  • if you are installing a single antenna, it is not be more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • if you are installing two antennas, one is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension, and the other is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • the cubic capacity of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
  • an antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension;
  • an antenna mounted on the roof only sticks out above the roof when there is a chimney-stack. In this case, the antenna should not stick out more than 60 centimetres above the highest part of the roof, or above the highest part of the chimney stack, whichever is lower; and
  • an antenna is not installed on a chimney, wall, or a roof slope which faces onto, and is visible from, a road or a Broads waterway. (If you are not sure, get advice from the local planning authority.)

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